All-Things-Green Salad Drizzled with Red Wine-Honey Vinaigrette


IMG_8920Light olive-green Baby Lima Beans, grass Green (English) Peas, the palest yellow-green Lady Peas tossed together with emerald mint leaves, brownish-green pistachios and  lime-green pea shoots lightly coated with an easy honey vinaigrette dressing.

Third Thursday Community Potluck was once again upon us and I had to make something good and fast. Digging through my freezer I found a bag each of fresh frozen baby limas, lady peas and green peas. All from the Nashville Downtown Farmer’s Market this past summer and all grown right here in middle Tennessee at local farms.

Which brings me to fundraisers and good deeds and all kinds of things like that. My friend and neighbor, Harriet Warner, sent me some information about a gathering that addresses all of the above. It is the Cumberland River Compact’s 4th Annual “Farm to Fork” dinner which brings top chefs together to celebrate local food, drink and clean water. If you would like to attend this fabulous evening of cool people who are interested in good food and keeping our beautiful Cumberland River clean and fresh go here for lots more information including menu, chefs…who, what, when and where. Or just go right here to buy tickets to be part of this great dinner party.

Now, back to my own little farm to fork dish,….peas and beans thawed, rinsed and drained…blanched in boiling water for a few minutes and again drained.


Ah ha! A jar of salt preserved lemons hiding in the back of my pantry! I know they are yellow, but might add just the right saltiness to the salad…slivered and chopped.


Mint from the backyard.


Red wine honey vinaigrette drizzled on top.


Tender pea shoots waiting to top off the salad along with some dusty green pistachios to add a bit of crunch.



All-Things-Green Salad with a Simple Red Wine-Honey Vinaigrette

  • Servings: 12
  • Time: 1hr
  • Print



  • 3 cups each fresh or frozen Baby Lima Beans, Lady Peas, and Green(English) Peas
  • 1 bunch of fresh mint
  • 2 TBSP’s thin slivers of preserved lemon
  • 1/2 cup shelled pistachios
  • 2 cups loosely packed green pea shoots
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 TBSP honey
  • 2 tsps Dijon mustard
  • sea or kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste


  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add a bit of salt.  Toss in the baby lime beans, lady peas & green peas. Cook for about 5 minutes. Pour peas and beans into a colander to drain. Rinse with cool running water. Leave to drain and cool down for 20 minutes. Place in a large serving bowl.
  2. Pour the olive oil, vinegar, honey and mustard in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid and shake to emulsify. Season with a bit of salt and black pepper to suit your taste. Set aside.
  3. Roughly chop the mint leaves and add to the bowl of beans and peas along with the preserved lemon slivers. Cover and chill until ready to serve.
  4. When ready to serve drizzle the vinaigrette over all and toss gently. Top with the tender pea shoots and pistachios.

Note: This is a perfect salad for a crowd. I made it for the September Third Thursday Community Potluck dinner. You could also cut it in half for a family dinner. There was a little bit left so I ate it the next day for lunch and it was even better!

You can use edamame if you cannot find lady peas. I used summer beans and peas that I had frozen, but store-bought frozen product works great too.

Teresa Blackburn


“Bow-Wow Peanut Butter Dog Treats”




We all need to just have fun sometimes…doing something a bit silly. Today was my day! Or maybe, to be honest, one of many days, but that is another story.

I have been holding onto this little recipe for some time now. It was given to me by my friend and baker extraordinaire Gina Olds. Although she makes a mean baguette and the flakiest of croissants what used to be a hit at our house was her homemade dog treats! Not for me, nor Wouter, but for our dog Ella. When Gina closed her neighborhood bakery it was a rather sad day. Suddenly, like Old Mother Hubbard, our cupboard was a bit bare!

Gina gave all the pups in Historic Germantown a treat when they stopped by her bakery to visit…which they did every day because she gave them a treat! It was kinda like which came first the dog visit or the dog treat if you know what I am getting at. To see some of the many reasons why I like Gina so much check out her blog Heart Written Words.

Her dog treats were so good, natural with no chemicals or sugars, that some of the babies in our neighborhood used them for teething biscuits! I am not kidding! True story.

Peanut butter is the “hook” flavor..who doesn’t like peanut butter? I know some of you cannot eat it, but it is for the dog…right? Use Almond butter if peanut butter cannot enter your home. Your dog will love them, and you, just as well.


Sources for Dog Bone Treat cookie cutters:

Other ingredients you will probably have on hand are flour, baking powder, egg, milk.



Baked for almost an hour…dry and crunchy, peanut butter dog treats. So easy. What great holiday (yes I just said that word) gifts for your dog friends.



I must get every crumb!


Is this all there is?


Bow-Wow Peanut Butter Dog Treats

  • Servings: 24-30
  • Time: 1hr 15mins
  • Print



  • 2 1/2 – 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup smooth peanut butter (or almond butter)
  • 3/4 cup “0” fat milk (Ella is on a diet!) you can use whole fat
  • Special tool: Dog Bone cookie cutter


  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle or dough hook mix together the flour, baking powder. Mix on low to blend.
  3. Add egg and peanut butter. Mix on medium speed until well blended. Turn mixer to low and drizzle in milk until a dough forms.
  4. Divide dough in half and roll out on a lightly floured board to about 1/2 inch thick. Cut into bones using shaped cookie cutter. Place bones on a parchment paper lined sheet pan.
  5. Bake for about 1 hour or until treats are hard and crunchy. Let cool completely and store in an airtight container.

As you can see from the photos of Ella above she ate every crumb and longing looked for more as she licked her lips!

These can be made with large or small bone shaped cookie cutters…I used a larger size but next time I will use a smaller size and make twice as many.

These treats make wonderful gifts for your dog friends!

Teresa Blackburn


Dog Bone Cookie cutters – Michaels or online

French rolling-pin/Marble slab for rolling pastry – Williams Sonoma


Blue Goose Italian Prune Tartlets for the First Day of Fall



It is an afternoon of dramatic lighting, rain and thunder.  Much needed cooling temperatures and a bowl of Blue Goose Prunes for baking simple tartlets.

They sit in an old metal bowl as  the light slowly dims seeming to have an inner glow.


I am enchanted with the texture and flavor. Somewhat like a plum but not…smaller and more oval, just a bit dryer in texture but every bite as sweet.  I do think they will be wonderful baked in a simple crust.

DSC_1194A rare sight is a bag of fresh prunes in my local grocery.  Why is this? It seems this particular and specifically grown Italian prune, which is not eaten dried but fresh,  has a short growing season and is pretty uncommon in the Southern USA. A good reason to try these beauties while I have the chance.


Cut in half and easily pitted….tossed with dark brown sugar & Ligonberry liqueur I leave them to macerate for about 20 minutes.


Some whipped cream cheese blended with lemon zest and a bit more brown sugar.


See how beautiful the flesh of the prunes are after their soaking? I am using some thawed, frozen homemade pie dough, rolled out and cut into squares, with a smear of the cream cheese mixture before adding a 5 prune halves.


I gathered the dough up and around the fruit and then drizzled the leftover juice from the bowl of fruit into and over each tartlet. Ready to bake on a parchment paper lined sheet pan…..


25 minutes later….warm, juicy fruit in a crispy, not soggy bottomed, crust!


Finished with a  dusting of powdered sugar..

Blue Goose Italian Prune Tartlets



  • 1 lb Blue Goose Italian Prunes (or any other fresh prune or plum)rinsed & patted dry
  • Pie crust dough for a double crust pie (homemade, refrigerator crust, frozen)
  • 3/4 cup dark brown sugar, divided
  • 1/4 cup Ligonberry liqueur (or any not too sweet fruit liqueur)
  • 8 ounces whipped cream cheese at room temperature
  • zest of one lemon
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice


  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.
  2. Half and core the prunes and place them in a mixing bowl.
  3. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the dark brown sugar and the Ligonberry liqueur over the prunes and toss well. Set aside for about 20 minutes for fruit to macerate. Toss with a spoon a few times during this time.
  4. In a small bowl blend the softened whipped cream cheese, remaining 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, lemon zest and juice together until spreadable.
  5. Meanwhile roll out pie crust dough on a lightly floured surface into a large rectangle. Cut into 6 squares. Each should measure about 6 x 6 inches more or less.
  6. Smear an equal amount of the cream cheese mixture in the middle of each square and top with 4 or 5 prune halves. Gather the dough edges up and around the fruit mixture to create a pouch with an open center. Place each one on the prepared sheet pan not touching.
  7. There will be some sugared fruit syrup left in the bowl where the prunes were macerating so pour this evenly into the openings of each pouch letting some run over the outside of the dough.
  8. Place sheet pan in the oven and bake for about 25-30 minutes or until tartlets are golden brown and crisp on the outside with a bubbly fruit center.
  9. Remove pan from the oven and let cool for about 10-15 minutes before serving dusted with powdered sugar. These are also very good the next day cold or at room temperature.

Teresa Blackburn

Build a Food Blog Worth Following


Hi there Food on Fifth fans! I want to share this article written by Michelle over at WordPress’ Daily Post in which I was included.

Other than moi being highlighted this is a really interesting article on food blogging with some really good ideas on writing, imagery and general direction you want your blog to go in.

Lots of great sites to visit as well….see you soon with more recipes and photos…less talk.

Make your food blog as addictive as your mac n’ cheese recipe with these five tips.

Source: Build a Food Blog Worth Following


So Long Summer Salad – Watermelon, Radishes, Tomatoes & Strawberries



This is probably it…the last great watermelon until next summer…crisp little colorful radishes, a handful of strawberries that taste like strawberries and meaty baby Roma tomatoes…my So Long Summer Salad. Bye bye for now…see you later…Sayanora sweet friends.


All cut up in a bowl…..


drizzled with this sublime Apple Balsamic Vinegar.


Tossed and chilled. Cold, crunchy, sweet and savory. Delicious piled on a bed of peppery arugula alongside a grilled steak. So long summer…it’s been good to know ya…

The Del McCoury Band – So Long, It’s Been Good To Know You

So Long Summer Salad with Watermelon, Radishes, Tomatoes and Strawberries

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 30mins
  • Print



  • 3 cups of fresh watermelon cubes
  • 4 small radishes thinly slices
  • a handful of baby Roma, cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half lengthwise
  • ripe, juicy strawberries, capped & cut in half lengthwise
  • Apple Balsamic Vinegar (or Orange Balsamic or other fruit flavored Balsamic vinegar)
  • Sea Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper


  1. Put all the fruit in a large mixing or serving bowl. Drizzle with 2 or 3 tablespoons of the Apple Balsamic vinegar. Toss fruit to coat with vinegar. Chill covered for about 20 minutes.
  2. Right before serving, drizzle with additional vinegar, salt & black pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking.

Teresa Blackburn

A September of Turbulent Times, Simple Servings, Hunger Action


These past few weeks have been unsettling. There is hardly an hour of any day that goes by that there is not another story of worldwide familial sadness confronting us. The Syrian diaspora alone is mind and heart wrenching. The details grim and unnerving.

While following these international events my mind always turns to practical matters. Food and water. Very simple and practical. I ponder the overabundance that is so unevenly distributed. I ponder how much I have and wonder how much I need. These are turbulent times and times for questionings…personal assessments of what is good for the most and how my actions affect everything else I come into contact with.

I received an invitation recently to an upcoming food event where for $500 I can have the privilege of hobnobbing with well-known chefs and food glitterati. I also received another invitation a few days later to make a donation to Second Harvest Food Bank to take action against hunger in Middle Tennessee. I have made my choice…I will not be hobnobbing, not that I am against it if that is your thing, but will at the same time encourage you to perhaps hobnob one day and consider Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee for another. If you choose here is where to make a donation.

FullSizeRender FullSizeRender FullSizeRender

My recipe offering is a simple serving using three ingredients, locally grown okra, sea salt & olive oil. Roasted Okra Pods can be cooked in an oven, in a heavy stove-top cast iron skillet or on the grill. When roasted the okra becomes a bit crisp  and has none of the so-called sliminess that is often associated with okra cooked by other methods.

Roasted Okra Pods

  • Servings: 2-4
  • Time: 15mins
  • Print



  • 1/2 lb firm, fresh whole okra pods, rinsed & patted dry
  • Olive oil
  • Crunch sea salt or kosher salt


  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Put dry okra pods on a sheet pan covered with parchment paper. Drizzle somewhat generously with olive oil. Toss to coat with your hands. Spread okra out on sheet pan in a single layer. Scatter sea salt over okra.
  3. Roast okra for 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from oven to cool a few minutes and serve.

Teresa Blackburn

 Think, Cook, Share.

End-of-Summer (5 Ingredient) Refrigerator Plum Jam with Calvados




Plums have been plentiful this summer and when just ripe, but still firm, they make the best jam. Jam you will appreciate a few months from now when days are shorter, darker and summer flavors just a memory.

I love plums and have often shared recipes and plum stories with you here at Food on Fifth.  There have been Plum ClafoutisPlum Yum Almond Cake and Stone Fruit Skillet Cake with Maple Drizzle among others.

The plums you see in the photo below were ones left unused after a photo shoot. They had time to sit out on the studio counter ripening all week and went home with me at week’s end.

DSC_6245Three simple ingredients and two special ones, Calvados and Cardamom! Calvados is a good flavor-pairing with fruits when making cakes, pies or jams, due to it apple origins. It is a French apple brandy, starting out as apples, fermenting into a cider, aged in oak casks to become Calvados. Cardamom…I cannot say enough good things about this spice… with its strong spicy sweet taste adding seductive aromatics with just a pinch!


Four pounds of plums with peels left on…making this recipe even easier!


Sugar, ground cardamom…plums cooking down….Calvados & lemon zest added at the end of cooking time…


Spooned into clean glass canning jars, topped off..ready to give away or refrigerate until ready to use. By the way…very yummy spooned over sponge cake or ice cream while still warm! And how about serving this with your roasted hen or turkey instead of cranberry sauce for Thanksgiving? Nice!



Beautifully messy.


From my summer travels: “Plums in Budapest” # 1 and #2 iphone images

IMG_7485 IMG_7539

Simple Summer (5 Ingredient) Refrigerator Plum Jam with Calvados

  • Servings: 8cups
  • Time: 1hr
  • Difficulty: easy-as-pie
  • Print



  • 4 lbs plums, pitted, unpeeled and chopped
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1/2 cup Calvados
  • 1 TBSP fresh lemon zest


  1. Put chopped plums & sugar in a large non-reactive saucepan. Bring to a low boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for about 25 minutes or until mixture begins to thicken and plums break down.
  2. Stir in cardamom and continue cooking for another 15 minutes. Stir often and skim any foam from the surface of the mixture.
  3. Add Calvados & lemon zest. Simmer another 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Place pan on a cooking rack so air can circulate around the pan to cool it down faster. Let cool for 10 minutes.
  4. Spoon plum jam into sterilized glass canning jars. Wipe rims of jars clean, top with lids and allow to cool completely.
  5. Jam will keep in refrigerator for up to 1 month.  If you do not give some of this fine jam away to your friends (they will be forever grateful I promise) then freeze for later.

Note on freezing: If you plan to freeze some of these jars of jam then fill jars leaving a 1″ head space to allow for jam to expand when frozen. I did not do this many years ago and upon opening my freezer I found jars of jam exploding out of the top of the glass jars! The lids had been pushed completely off! Now I allow for that!


Teresa Blackburn        www.foodonfifth


Red and White hand towel –

Canning jars –

Vintage glass canning funnel, silver spoons, Vintage Kobe Turquoise saucepan – my prop collection but check out Etsy or ebay for similar items

Blue enamel colander – World Market

Travel Budapest –