Slow Roasted Blood Orange Upside-Down Cake

Blood Oranges and I have a long-standing love affair. In years past I have posted recipes for Blood Orange-cello, Blood Orange Meringue Tartlets, and Blood Orange and Bourbon Chipotle BBQ Chicken among others. I am drawn to the mottled red-orange skin and the inner blood-red burst of color as much as to the flavor. They are natural art works, each and every one unique and deliciously stunning.

This is a simple upside down cake with slow-roasted blood oranges which brings out another layer of tastiness. Blood oranges are abundant in supermarkets this time of year so eat them while you can…raw, cooked or juiced.

Full of antioxidants and high in Vitamin C and potassium, Blood Oranges are uniquely colored due to “anthocyanins”. These are flavonoid pigments which exist in red and purple vegetables, most berries and are incredibly healthy.

Thinly sliced and ready for roasting…..

….sprinkled lightly with raw sugar…..

….roasted at 275 degrees for 45 minutes……

….in my favorite Lodge cast iron skillet.   First smeared with butter….

….the bottom covered with roasted rings of oranges and another sprinkle of sugar.

Topped with cake batter and baked…..

…ready to eat. So good with a cup of coffee or tea on a cold winter day.

Slow Roasted Blood Orange Upside-Down Cake

  • Servings: 8-10
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Ingredients:

  • 4 blood oranges
  • 1 1/4 cups raw or  turbinado sugar, divided
  • 8 tablespoons softened butter, divided
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup yellow cornmeal or polenta
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk or vanilla yogurt

Directions:

  1. To roast blood orange slices:  Preheat oven to 275 degrees. Cut ends off of each orange and then slice thinly, removing any seeds as you work.
  2. Arrange blood orange slices flat on a baking sheet and sprinkle with 1/2 cup of raw sugar. Roast for about 45 minutes or until they are caramelized and softened. Remove pan from oven and let cool for 10 minutes.
  3. Turn oven to 350 degrees. Smear a 10 inch cast iron skillet with 2 tablespoons of the butter to coat bottom and sides. Arrange roasted orange slices, slightly overlapping, in the bottom of the skillet and sprinkle with 1/4 cup of raw sugar.
  4. Whisk together the flour, cornmeal, baking powder and salt in a bowl.
  5. Using an electric mixer beat together the remaining 6 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup raw sugar until fluffy. Add in vanilla and blend.
  6. Mix in eggs, one at a time, beating well after each one.
  7. Add flour mixture and buttermilk, alternately, ending with flour just until well mixed.
  8. Drop batter by spoonfuls over sugared orange slices in skillet and gently spread out evenly.
  9. Bake cake until a tester comes out clean, about 35-45 minutes. Cool cake for 10 minutes in skillet. Run a small knife around edge to loosen if necessary.
  10. Place a plate over the top of the skillet and flip to loosen cake onto plate using oven mitts or kitchen towels so you don’t burn your hands! Scrape out any sugar-juice mixture left in skillet and smear over cake. Serve cake warm or at room temp.

Teresa Blackburn   teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

Good Vibes Black-eyed Pea Vegetable Soup…It’s Never Too Late

Some say there is no such thing as “good or bad luck”….maybe so, maybe not.

Do you believe the Southern lore based around  eating black-eyed peas and greens on New Years Day? That doing so will bring you good luck all year?  Is this a tradition to which you adhere?

Other than us all needing as much good luck as we can find, I truly love this humble pea…dried or frozen in the winter, fresh in the summer. See this colander of peas? My good friend, Stephanie gave me a bag of fresh, frozen black-eyed peas from her Mother’s garden in West Tennessee as a holiday gift and I cannot think of many things better.

I started my pot of soup early on New Years Day…letting it simmer with ham pieces, carrots and zucchini. This year I made more of a traditional soup with tomatoes and broth. I tossed in a few handfuls of fresh spinach right at the end.  This is bright colorful recipe.  2017 has been harsh politically, and the world in general could use some “good luck vibes”.  So eat your peas and stir up some good luck….it’s never too late!

Good Vibes Black-eyed Pea Vegetable Soup

  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces cooked ham cut into small chunks
  • 4 carrots, peeled and sliced (I used the pretty multicolored carrots)
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 2 small to medium zucchini squash, chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cups frozen black-eyed peas, thawed
  • 2 cans stewed tomatoes with juice
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 2 handfuls of baby spinach
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. In a large stock pot heat olive oil over medium high heat. Toss in ham, carrots, celery, onion and zucchini and cook just until vegetables are almost soft. Stir often.
  2. Add black-eyed peas, tomatoes and chicken broth. Add 2 cups water. Season with salt and black pepper. Bring pot to a boil, turn to simmer and cook for about 30 minutes or just until peas are firm-soft.
  3. Toss in baby spinach leaves and stir into soup. Spinach will wilt quickly.
  4. Serve hot with your favorite cornbread or crackers. Good Luck!

teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

 

Pomelo Marmalade for Paddington

“I came all the way in a lifeboat, and ate marmalade. Bears like marmalade.” quote:  Paddington Bear.

I, too, like marmalade. And it’s such a pretty word as well. It sounds like it tastes. I’ve posted other marmalade recipes...”Maple-Kumquat Marmalade”“Meyer Lemon Marmalade” and my most popular “Buddha’s Hand Good Luck Marmalade”. They are all tasty and I do think Paddington might like them very much.  But…..

…this week I chose the imposingly large Pomelo citrus for making marmalade. You may have seen them in the grocery. They look like a giant grapefruit, but are about the size of your head…really, truly…unless you have a very small head. They aren’t hard to find in January and February in most supermarkets or import groceries. Pomelos are tangy like a lemon mixed with the sweetness of an orange. A complex tasting citrus. Full of Vitamin C they can be juiced like most citrus of course. These Pomelos were so large I only needed two for 4 pints of marmalade! If you want to know a bit more about the Pomelo click here.

The pith is very thick and when cut away leaves a round fruit about the size of a large grapefruit…they are from the same family of citrus by the way.

Rind is cut away and into thin strips. Pith is removed. Fruit is then cut into sections. Scraps and seeds are gathered into a cheesecloth bundle to flavor the marmalade.

Cooked down for a few hours with sugar in the final stage, then poured into clean, sterilized glass jars with lids. The recipe is easy and you can substitute Grapefruits if you like.

 

A new-old trick I recently learned about is to seal jars in a low temp oven! Works like a charm and no hot water bath. This doesn’t work for all canning, but is particularly good for high pectin fruits.

Thick sliced whole grain bread toasted with a slather of softened butter, topped with “Pomelo Marmalade”. Perfect for me and perfect for Paddington!

Pomelo Marmalade for Paddington

Ingredients:

  • 2 Pomelos (or four grapefruit if you must)
  • 6 cups white sugar
  • 2 1/5 cups water

Equipment: cheesecloth and twine, enamel or stainless pot, 4 pint canning jars with new lids

Directions:

  1. Slice off the tops and bottoms of the Pomelos and discard.
  2. Peel the rind/skin away from each using a sharp knife or peeler, trying to get as little white pith as you can. Cut into thin strips. Set aside.
  3. Cut away as much of the pith from each Pomelo as you can. Discard.
  4. Slice the flesh of each Pomelo away from the center core. The center is where the seeds are. Tie the seedy cores up in cheesecloth and twine making a sachet. Set aside.
  5. Section the flesh and put into a food processor, pulsing until finely ground up. Pour all the juice and flesh into a non-reactive pot…enamel or stainless steel. Add 2 1/2 cups water. Bring to a boil, then turn to simmer, covered, for 15 minutes. Remove from heat.
  6. Add the sachet to the pot, submerging down into the hot liquid. Refrigerate this mixture overnight. (The seeds are soft and contain pectin which will help the marmalade set up naturally.)
  7. The next day, squeeze the sachet out very well into the Pomelo mixture. Discard sachet.
  8. Add 6 cups of sugar to the mix and while stirring, bring the mixture to a boil over high heat.
  9. Reduce heat to medium-low and continue to cook, stirring often for about 1 hr. until reduced and thickened.
  10. Turn oven to 250 degrees.
  11. Spoon hot marmalade into sterilized glass jars leaving 1/2 inch at top of each unfilled. Wipe mouths of jars clean and top with lids.
  12. Place filled jars, not touching, in a baking pan and put in oven for about 25 minutes. Remove from oven and let jars cool on a wire rack. Listen for the “ping” or suction sound as the lids seal to the jars. Lids will go from being a bit concave right out of the oven to convex after cooling. Store in a dark cabinet for up to 12 months. (If jars do not seal then refrigerate for up to 2 months or give away as gifts!)

teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

 

Happy New Year Cheese Crackers E. A. T. #26

While noodling around on the internet this week looking for inspiration for a “nosh of note”, I ran across a recipe for “Parmesan Cream Crackers” by Mark Bittman that was published in the New York Times cooking section a few years ago.  Homemade crackers would certainly qualify as a “nosh of note” wouldn’t they? Bittman’s basic recipe has just a few ingredients and from start to finish, 25 minutes/ I had a pan of freshly baked crackers. What could be easier than that?

Encouraged I took the basic recipe and ran with it…first batch I topped with toasted sesame seeds….which thankfully you can now purchase already toasted. Would you like to know how many sesame seeds I have burned up toasting them myself? Thousands I would guess.

The simple dough needs to be rolled out thinly and cut/scored before baking. The second batch I added fresh thyme leaves and red pepper flakes for a bit of heat.

On a roll I whipped up a few other batches using various toss-ins and toppings such as crunchy sea salt, black pepper, espresso cocoa sea salt….

….bittersweet chocolate, chopped pistachios, orange peel and crunchy raw sugar.

Two hours later sheet pans of savory aromatic crackers covered the kitchen counters, ready to accompany a cheese platter along with a few bottles of bubbly for a New Year’s Eve with good, long-time friends…it was as Easy as This.

Note: “Nosh of note” was a quote from my friend, Nancy Vienneau, within an invite to a New Years Eve gathering at her home. Check out her blog at “Good Food Matters”.

Note: You can find the original recipe for “Parmesan Cheese Crackers” by Mark Bittman here..

Happy New Year Cheese Crackers

  • Difficulty: easyasthis
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For basic Parmesan Cheese Crackers:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus extra for rolling out
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup cream + more as needed to make dough

For “Toss-ins and Toppings” that I used:

  • toasted sesame seeds
  • thyme leaves and pepper flakes
  • espresso-cocoa sea salt mixture
  • chopped pistachios and orange zest with black pepper
  • bittersweet chocolate, espresso powder, raw sugar and cinnamon
  • any number of other ideas pop into my head…pecans, walnuts, green tea, cayenne, any herbs, cardamom, lavender and lemon zest…use what you might have, what you like, and experiment.

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. To a food processor add flour, salt, Parmesan cheese and butter. Pulse to combine.
  3. If you choose to add any “toss ins” do so now, although the original recipe is fantastic as is.
  4. After adding “toss ins”…drizzle in cream while processor is running until a dough forms. If need be, add a wee bit more cream. Dough should be smooth and silky and not at all sticky.
  5. Roll dough out until thin, but workable, on lightly floured surface. Add flour as needed. Transfer dough to parchment lined baking sheet. (You can also simply roll the dough out on a sheet of lightly floured parchment and then transfer to sheet pans to save a step.
  6. Here is where the “toppings” part comes in. Sprinkle on top and gently press into surface of dough.
  7. Using a pastry wheel or knife cut/score dough so you can break into individual crackers after baking.
  8. Bake until golden, light browned…for about 10-13 minutes depending on your oven. Cool on wire rack. You can serve these crackers warm or at room temperature and they can be stored in air tight containers for a few days. They are great with a bowl of soup or as dippers.

teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

recipe adapted from a recipe by Mark Bittman published in the New York Times.

 

Tablescaping….Christmas Eve Dinner Party…2017

I am very taken with the “after” part of a dinner party. Napkins are crumpled, wine glasses with a smudge of red left in the bottom, some candles still burning, others not…empty plates and bowls. I find this all very beautiful for some reason…..But before that part…comes this part……

My holiday table scape always lacks a certain bourgeoisie ode to finery. I do not plan ahead very much….I have no official holiday china, and lord knows what I do have does not match. I was pretty thrilled to find a box of matching wine glasses in one of my props closets to use for Christmas Eve dinner this year. I do, on the other hand, have a fondness for beauty and art and how it can be evident in the small things. Setting the table is the first part of my favorite parts of having a dinner party.

It’s not that I have anything against things that match and pay tribute to the seasons, but just that I am not interested in that sort of thing. To many matching things make me kind of nervous. I feel content and satisfied in a certain amount of controlled chaos when it comes to “things”. The silver might or might not match, the linens napkins were gifted to me, two tables are put together to make one for 8 people, chairs are gathered randomly, there were a few tiny holes in the tablecloth which were covered by a runner and so on.

On December 24th each year Wouter and I host our small family for drinks and dinner. We have a pretty zany-hilarious time without the pressure of gift-giving (we gave that up years ago). We do exchange small items such as homemade cookies or jams on occasion, a pot of Amaryllis or a bottle of wine….so we are not totally Scrooge!

First we have champagne.

I keep the food simple and pretty much make ahead. Italian of some sort…with a really good salad and baguettes all toasty hot and ready for a smearing of softened butter. Chianti & Rose’s during dinner. Jugs of lemon water to temper the alcohol on the table. After dinner coffees and Brandy if you like with holiday cookies and ice cream. This all goes on for a few hours.

We have done “Christmas Crackers”, the British sort with toys and fortunes inside, not the ones you eat, since the “children” were little. Paper crowns and mustaches seem to bring out the best in everyone!

We do not talk about politics or anything that can quickly make us all crazy. This is not a “rule”, but we all seem to leave that behind for the evening. The idea is just to have fun and we do. We are a bit loud with lots of laughing and silliness and music. This year I played part of David Sedaris reading his hilarious “6 to 8 Black Men”.  It is especially funny as we have a Dutch-American family.  If you haven’t heard this story of Christmas in Holland and Saint Nicholas, as well as lots of other things, then you must.

Anyhow….I started this post thinking it would be about one of my favorite parts of any dinner party table…the aftermath! The evidence! The mess! The most artful part of the evening in many ways. What is left  behind after use. The imagery. Almost my favorite part!

Happy New Year Y’all.

 

 

 

 

Be Sweet…Sparkly Holiday Cookies

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Sparkly…Colorful….Shaped cookies. I made these last December and they were such fun. I used a variety of cookie cutters…some holiday and some not…lots of wee animal shapes. I mixed my own decorating sugar color combinations.

Be sweet this December…be kind….make some cookies…share. Peace.

The current issue of “edible Nashville” magazine featured my cookies along with the recipe. This makes my post even easier…you can get the recipe online from edible, or here in this post. Either way you go this is a very delicious simple sugar cookie recipe topped with lots of crunch, sparkly, seasonal colors for your holiday pleasure.

Sparkly Holiday Cookies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E.A.T. # 25 Soup Lovers Leftover-Turkey Noodle Soup

I love soup…cold soup in the summer, chili at the first sign of fall and hearty hot soups all winter long. Soups make me feel cozy and safe. Healthy and homey.

It’s as easy as this to make a “soup” lunch or dinner in under an hour. Leftover holiday turkey meat, some vegetables, noodles, broth and herbs are all you need. Gruyere cheese melted on slices of bread round out the meal.

Any noodles you like will work fine. Long spaghetti noodles, or macaroni or you can even break up a few lasagna noodles to toss into the pot. I used some Strozzapreti I picked up at Eataly the last time I was in Chicago. These noodles, somewhat like Cavatelli,  are short, sturdy, rolled and are good for holding juices and sauce.

A leftover over roasted turkey breast from Thanksgiving, a few cans of tomatoes, carrots and onions, broth and herbs are the other basic ingredients.

One of my favorite winter lunches is enjoying a good bowl of hot soup while catching up on my reading or looking at art books or magazines. We all need some time to be quiet and alone,  letting our thoughts wander and weave about randomly. I find this is when I work things out in my head or absorb and develop new ideas for projects. Try it.

This is more of an “idea of soup” than an actual “must follow” recipe. Use what you like and what you have on hand. No rules, just tasty ingredients. It really is as Easy as This….Stay warm.

Soup Lovers Leftover-Turkey Noodle Soup

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: very easy
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Ingredients:

  • 2-4 cups chopped or shredded turkey or chicken meat
  • a splash of olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 4 carrots, peeled and chopped or sliced
  • 3 cans fire-roasted tomatoes with juice
  • 4 cups low sodium/fat chicken broth
  • fresh thyme leaves or any herbs you prefer
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 cups short pasta noodles such as cavatelli, macaroni or strozzapretti

Directions:

  1. Cook the pasta noodles very al dente in a pot of salted water, drain and set aside.
  2. Add a splash of olive oil to a soup pot and heat over medium high heat. Toss into the pot the chopped  onion and carrots. Cook until onions are transparent.
  3. To the pot add the tomatoes and chicken broth, turkey or chicken meat, fresh thyme leaves and other herbs, salt and black pepper. Bring to a low boil. Taste and adjust seasoning to your liking.
  4. Right before serving add the al dente pasta noodles to the hot soup. Serve with slices of good bread toasted with Gruyere cheese on top.

Stay cozy and warm.

teresablackburnfoodstyling.com    foodonfifth.com