Desirable Avocado Toast with French Breakfast Radishes – A 5 minute Meal

I am always cooking. Almost every day. I, at times, have a love-hate relationship with cooking. Some days I chose not to cook, but we still have to eat…no? Yes. This is what we might have on those days. I realize there are at least one million, at least, Pinterest Boards dedicated to avocados and toast…I haven’t counted but I’m pretty sure this is somewhat true. Avocado on toasted bread is de regueur for all modern minded folks from coast to coast.

There is no recipe, but desire. There is no one way to make it except the way you like it with a just right-ripe avocado and the best bread you can get your hands on. It takes 5 minutes at most.

A sprinkling of thinly sliced Spring/French Garden radishes from the Nashville Farmer’s Market for a bit of crunch topped off lightly with sea salt. You’re good to go.

Eat Well…eat healthy.

Desirable Avocado Toast with French Breakfast Radishes

Ingredients for this “not real” recipe:

  • very good crusty loaf of bread…homemade or store-bought
  • just ripe avocados that are “smush-able
  • french breakfast radishes or other locally grown radishes or from grocery
  • crunchy seal salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • arugula leaves

Directions for this “not real” recipe”:

  1. Toast bread.
  2. “Smush” ripe avocados onto bread.
  3. Top with thinly sliced radishes.
  4. Sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper.
  5. Top with arugula leaves.
  6. Eat. Enjoy.

Teresa Blackburn    http://www.teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

 

Summer Lunch – Lemony Tuna and Kalamata Olives with a Crusty Baguette – E.A.T. #30

A good lunch is a wonderful thing.  To sit down and actually savor a mid-day or late afternoon lunch when I get a chance is a pleasure. My lunches take little prep and use pantry items along with a few fresh vegetables I have on hand. It takes just a few minutes to make it happen. It’s as easy as this.

Here is one of my current favorites using lemons, kalamata olives, tuna packed in olive oil, marinated red onions and fresh oregano leaves. I serve this with a crusty baguette for sopping up all the flavorful juices.

It’s summer in Nashville, it’s hot and humid..take a break from the stove….eat cool…eat simple…enjoy.

Summer Lunch -Lemony Tuna and Kalamata Olives with a Crusty Baguette

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 red onion, slivered and soaked in lemon juice for 15 minutes
  • 2 cans tuna packed in olive oil, slightly drained and leaving larger chunks of tuna
  • 1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives
  • the peel of one lemon cut into thin strips
  • the juice of one lemon
  • 2 tablespoons torn fresh oregano leaves
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 fresh baguette

Directions:

  1. In a bowl gently toss together red onion with lemon juice, tuna chunks with oil, kalamata olives, lemon peel strips, lemon juice and oregano. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cover and let sit for 10 minutes before serving.
  2. Serve with baguette pieces for sopping up juices. A Great nutritious lunch that is as Easy As This!

Teresa Blackburn    http://www.teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

 

 

 

A Wee Sponge Cake with Tennessee Strawberries and Whipped Cream

 

Does this cake look gigantic to you? I thought so. Well it is really just 6 inches across….really. A wee, dramatic “Tennessee Strawberry Sponge Cake with Whipped Cream”.  A cake that is just enough to serve 6 people, or 2 people for 3 days…or maybe even 1 person for 6 days. Any way you slice it, this cake is easy to make, adorable and scrumptious.

I posted a “Victoria Sponge and Strawberries” as well as a “Ruby Red Victoria Sponge Cake with Lemon Mascarpone Filling” cake recipes a few years ago. They are larger cakes…..this is the “little sister” cake. If you wander over to those recipes you will find out a bit more about the history of the Victoria Sponge which is a good cake to make this week to celebrate summer, strawberries and the Big Wedding in London.

Later this year there will be a cookbook arriving on the dessert scene that features small cakes. “little everyday cakes” by Candace Floyd, published by Spring House Press.  My wee cake is inspired by Candace’s upcoming book. I was lucky and pleased to be asked to work on styling the cakes for this book. It’ll be out in October,  but if you want you can pre-order via Amazon.

Maybe we shouldn’t deny ourselves cake,  but just go smaller.

If a 10″ springform pan went on a diet this is what they would look like. These are my favorite 6″ springform cake pans from Fat Daddio’s.

Layers baked and split into 4, cream whipped fluffy, local strawberries macerated with a bit of raw sugar….that’s all.

Local berries will go quickly…make it now.

A Wee Sponge Cake with Tennessee Strawberries and Whipped Cream

Special Tools:  Two six inch cake pans, preferably springform as they are easier to get layers out of..but whatever you have that size.

Ingredients:

  • 1  1/4 cup self-rising flour, sifted
  • 4 large eggs, separated
  • 1/2 cup superfine sugar or powdered sugar
  • pinch of sea salt
  • coconut oil spray for greasing cake pans
  • 2 to 3 pints of fresh, early summer strawberries, tops removed and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup raw sugar
  • 2 pints of heavy whipping cream
  • powdered sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Generously spray cake pans with coconut oil spray. This will actually add a nice subtle flavor to cakes. Set aside.
  2. Beat egg yolks and sugar together until creamy and pale.
  3. Beat egg whites until stiff.
  4. Whisk the egg whites into the egg yolk mixture.
  5. Working a little bit at a time, fold the flour into the egg mixture using a large spoon until  blended. Fold in the sea salt.
  6. Scrape batter into cake pans. Bake for about 20 minutes until cakes are done in the middle. Let cool for a few minutes in the pans and then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. While cake layers are baking, toss together the berries and the raw sugar.  If some berries are large then cut in half or into quarters. Set aside, in a smaller bowl, about 1/2 cup of the berries.
  8. Using a fork or potato masher, lightly crush remaining sugared berries just a bit. Let sit for about 30 minutes while cakes are baking and cooling.
  9. When cakes are totally cooled, split each layer into two thinner layers to make four.
  10. Whip cream to soft peaks.
  11. To assemble cake place one layer on a serving plate and cover with a third of the berries and juices and top berries with a third of the whipped cream. Repeat with next two layers and topping off with the fourth layer. Add the smaller bowl of berries, not crushed, on top of the cake. Chill for 1 hour before serving. The berry juice will soak into the cake layers somewhat and make for a delicious dessert. Dust with powdered sugar right before serving. If you happen to have any “sad” leftovers…then cover and chill cake up to 2 days.

Cream Baked Cardamom-Vanilla Bean Pears

 

Pears in poetry, pears in art, pears in history, pears in life. Quintessentially feminine and delicious. Luscious when ripe and baked in cream, pears dusted with sugar, cardamom and vanilla. A simple plate of goodness.

Pears from our pear tree last summer. The tree is already heavy with young, thumb size fruit. The anticipation is dreamy.

Cut, cored and peeled. Baked.

Warm from the oven I can think of few things I like better than the first bite. Market pears will do until fall.

Cream-Baked Cardamom and Vanilla Bean Pears

Ingredients:

  • 4 small ripe, but firm pears, peeled, cut in half and cored
  • 4 Tablespoons butter, room temp, divided
  • 1/4 cup raw sugar, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • beans scraped from one vanilla bean
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Smear bottom of a pie dish with 2 Tablespoons of the butter. Sprinkle with 1 Tablespoons raw sugar.
  3. Mix together in a small bowl the remaining raw sugar, the cardamom and vanilla beans.
  4. Place pear halves, cut side down, in the bottom of the pie dish.
  5. Melt remaining 2 Tablespoons butter and brush over the pears. Sprinkle with the sugar mixture.
  6. Gently pour heavy cream around the pears. Place dish in the oven.
  7. Bake for about 25 minutes or until pears are just tender and the cream has thickened.  Remove dish from oven to cool on a wire rack. Serve pears and cream warm or at room temperature.

Teresa Blackburn   www.teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

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20 Minute Dinner Tuna Salad with Iron Skillet Sourdough-Parmesan Croutons Easy-as-This #29

There are tuna salads and Tuna Salads…and not all are created equal. The common link is usually a can of tuna. High in protein, very common and easy to find, canned tuna is one of my basic pantry staples. Combined with fresh greens, avocado, feta cheese, tomatoes, boiled eggs and a can of tuna makes one of our basic go-to meals….fresh and healthy.

Cans of tuna can vary greatly in quality, taste and how they are packed. I’m a big fan of “Ortiz Bonito Del Norte“. This  tuna is packed in olive oil and is line caught. Large chunks of firm tuna that are not chopped up and mealy with a sublime flavor are the hallmarks of this brand. Where do I find it? World Market where I now do a regular pantry staple grocery store run once a month. Pasta sauces, good spices, olive oils and cans of tuna, sardines and anchovies, not to mention their beer selection and candies. They are not paying me to say this. I don’t even know anyone who works at World Market, but when I find a good thing I like to share.

The can itself is a piece of art. Don’t you agree?

Top salad off with iron skillet Parmesan croutons and you’ve got a meal that takes about 20 minutes from the start to the first bite…it’s as Easy-as-This.

20 Minutes Dinner Salad with Sour Dough-Parmesan Croutons

Ingredients:

  • One can  Ortiz Bonito del Norte Tuna packed in olive oil, lightly drained
  • a handful of arugula or other green
  • one ripe avocado, cut into chunks
  • two cooked eggs, peeled and cut in half
  • 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes cut in half
  • Feta cheese chunks/crumbles to taste
  • a chunk of sour dough bread cut into cubes
  • olive oil
  • Parmesan cheese freshly grated
  • any Mexican spice blend that contains oregano or any other favorite spice blend
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Fresh lemon juice and/or your favorite vinaigrette dressing

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss chunks of sour dough bread with some olive oil to lightly coat and add to an iron skillet. Top with grated Parmesan cheese and spice blend. Stick in the open to crisp up for about 8 minutes. Remove from oven. While croutons are baking make the salads.
  2. Add half of each ingredient to two shallow bowls. Add a grinding of black pepper and shake of sea salt.
  3. Serve salads topped with a squeeze of lemon juice and/or a light drizzle of the dressing. Sprinkle crisp croutons on top. Start to finish 20 minutes!

Teresa Blackburn     www.teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

Rabbits-Love-Rainbow Carrots with Maple-Balsamic-Orange Glaze….Don’t They? E.A.T #28

I think I might be part rabbit…my ears are kinda pointy….I twitch my nose at good and bad smells…I have been accused of hopping around all over the place…not to mention my affinity for carrots. I like them shredded, cut into coins, added to soups and salads, fresh from the ground with a little bit of dirt still clinging to them and roasted lightly glazed with a quick maple syrup, balsamic vinegar and fresh orange juice concoction. Spring carrots tender and sweet lend themselves to such a simple, easy-as-this, recipe. A very appropriate addition to an Easter dinner.

One bag each of large and/or small, easy to find and trendy rainbow carrots sliced down the middle from top to bottom, tossed in olive oil and sprinkled with Flower Pepper from Food Sheriff and flakey Maldon sea salt…..a great finger food or side dish. Roasted, glazed and served garnished with toasted, chopped pecans. It’s as easy-as-this.

Happy Easter, Happy Spring, Happy Life.

Rainbow Carrots with a Maple-Balsamic-Orange Glaze

Ingredients:

  • 1 to 2 bags of rainbow carrots, any size, tops trimmed and peeled, cut in half lengthwise
  • olive oil, a few tablespoons
  • Flower Pepper or any other good freshly ground pepper
  • flakey sea salt such as Maldon
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup real maple syrup
  • the juice from one small orange
  • Garnish – toasted and chopped pecans

Directions:

  1. Turn oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Toss prepped carrots in olive oil and spread out on one or two baking sheets.  Season with pepper and salt to taste.
  3. Roast for 10 minutes.
  4. While carrots are roasting mix together the balsamic vinegar, maple syrup and orange juice.
  5. After 10 minutes remove baking sheet with carrots from the oven and drizzle with half the glaze. Return pan to oven to roast carrots just until “fork-tender”. Remove pan from oven.
  6. Serve carrots with remaining glaze and pecans.

Teresa Blackburn    http://www.teresablackburnfoodstyling.com

 

Food for Thought – Ode to “Mudbound” and Memory

I was going to post about salt this week, but I watched a movie instead. The movie is profoundly moving and made me start thinking about my past and present. “Mudbound” is  the movie I am talking about. Have you seen it?

Personal memory can often seem like a movie script. I think we all  carry images that seem like they are both real and unreal, with a filmy overlay softening what our minds can cope with at any given time. Good memories and troubling ones at the same time. Movies can provide structure and meaning to memories, movies can bring light to those  things kept hidden, movies are coping mechanisms.

These are the things that were remembered while watching “Mudbound”….

Riding to my “whites only” school in my “whites only” school bus in the early morning passing the “blacks only” school. Looking out the window, on my way to a classic American style brick school with new books, a packed library and good hot lunches….at what was basically a shack set up off the ground on brick-o blocks sitting on a flat dirt yard with no trees for shade, no ceiling fans, no new school books, no kitchen for hot lunches. No paint and barely a front door. A few black children playing in the dusty yard. I did not know until much later that the new books we were given at the first of every school year…the social  studies, history, geography books…would be the books used by those children next year. The cast offs, the written in. Our doodles and marks would be passed on.

My best friend’s grandfather owned the Esso station in our small community. It was where, on long summer days and after school we would go to get a Coke and Moon Pie and just hang out a bit listening to gossip and goofing off. It was where the bathroom door marked “Colored” was seldom used.

I had never been inside a black person’s  home until an accident called for it. While  riding in car…a big, old black Ford that still had the scratchy seats,  roll down windows and no car seats….that I accidentally, while the car driven by my uncle was slowly making a curve in the gravel country road, pushed down on the front door handle and fell out! Not completely, as I held on to the dashboard for dear life. My eyes were full of dust and debris from the gravel. Stopping the car he took me to the nearest house. I do not know who the woman was, but her house was like a “Mudbound” shack. She welcomed us in and she washed out my eyes and soothed me. My uncle knew her and she was kind. I had also never really looked at an elderly black person before as we were always told “not to stare”. But this woman’s face is forever etched in my memory. She was white-haired and very dark with lovely soft eyes that were bloodshot. Her house smelled like woody smoke and was dark with few windows, but a front porch and flowers. No electricity nor indoor plumbing. Her light was kerosene lanterns. There were doilies on all the furniture. I have always had a silly and ridiculous affection for the idea of a “shack”.

For me “Mudbound” was personal. For Wouter, who is from Amsterdam, I think more a horrify bit of American history that never ceases to stun him. It is a heartbreaker, it is a historical sore laid open, it is both very beautiful and ugly. It is so worth seeing. It’s Oscar time…watch a movie.